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After the crash : architecture in post-bubble Japan

By: Publication details: Princeton Architectural Press New York : 2008Description: 192 p. : ill. ; 22 cmISBN:
  • 9781568987767
Subject(s):
Contents:
Contents Foreword Study on the Edge by Hitoshi Abe Acknowledgments Introduction 1. Genealogies and Tendencies Less Than Zero: Minimalism and Beyond Re: Contextualism Kazunari Sakamoto: Keeping the Faith The Visceral and the Ephemeral Kazuhiro Ishii: Meta-architecture Paths of Least Resistance: Architectural Discourse in Japan 2. Domestic Spaces The Refraction House Two Degrees of Separation The Hu-tong House Pushing the Envelope 3. New Prototypes Brand Recognition: The FOB Homes System Reflecting Modern Life Living Dangerously: Reversible Destiny Lofts 4. Public Places The Sendai Mediatheque The Glass Library Immaculate Conception: The 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art Balancing Act: MVRDV in Japan 5. Revitalizing Metabolism Organ: Metabolism without Megastructure Kisho Kurokawa in Malaysia Mirage City: Another Utopia 6. Nature and Artifice Terunobu Fujimori: Back to Nature Strange Attractor: Yokohama International Port Terminal Borrowed Scenery: Walking in the Footsteps of Laurie Anderson 7. Urban Views Fitting In: Small Sites in Urban Japan Pretty Vacant: The Photographs of Takashi Homma Letter from Kyoto Afterword More Lines by Ari Seligmann Credits
Summary: In the late 1980s, Japan was awash in seemingly unlimited wealth and rising toward what would be the peak of its modern economic success, power, and influence. In 1991 the same lethal combination of risky loans, inflated stocks, and real estate speculation that created this "bubble economy" caused it to burst, plunging the country into its worst recession since World War II. New Zealand-born architect Thomas Daniell arrived in Japan at the dawn of this turbulent decade. After the Crash is an anthology of essays that draw on firsthand observations of the built environment and architectural culture that emerged from the economically sober post-bubble period of the 1990s. Daniell uses projects and installations by architects such as Atelier Bow Wow, Toyo Ito, and the metabolists to illustrate the new relationships forged, most of necessity, between architecture and society in Japan.
List(s) this item appears in: New Arrival 13 June 2022
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Books Books Anant National University Central Library 720.95209049 DAN (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Available 004580

Contents
Foreword
Study on the Edge by Hitoshi Abe
Acknowledgments
Introduction
1. Genealogies and Tendencies
Less Than Zero: Minimalism and Beyond
Re: Contextualism
Kazunari Sakamoto: Keeping the Faith
The Visceral and the Ephemeral
Kazuhiro Ishii: Meta-architecture
Paths of Least Resistance: Architectural Discourse in Japan
2. Domestic Spaces
The Refraction House
Two Degrees of Separation
The Hu-tong House
Pushing the Envelope
3. New Prototypes
Brand Recognition: The FOB Homes System
Reflecting Modern Life
Living Dangerously: Reversible Destiny Lofts
4. Public Places
The Sendai Mediatheque
The Glass Library
Immaculate Conception: The 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art
Balancing Act: MVRDV in Japan
5. Revitalizing Metabolism
Organ: Metabolism without Megastructure
Kisho Kurokawa in Malaysia
Mirage City: Another Utopia
6. Nature and Artifice
Terunobu Fujimori: Back to Nature
Strange Attractor: Yokohama International Port Terminal
Borrowed Scenery: Walking in the Footsteps of Laurie Anderson
7. Urban Views
Fitting In: Small Sites in Urban Japan
Pretty Vacant: The Photographs of Takashi Homma
Letter from Kyoto
Afterword
More Lines by Ari Seligmann
Credits

In the late 1980s, Japan was awash in seemingly unlimited wealth and rising toward what would be the peak of its modern economic success, power, and influence. In 1991 the same lethal combination of risky loans, inflated stocks, and real estate speculation that created this "bubble economy" caused it to burst, plunging the country into its worst recession since World War II. New Zealand-born architect Thomas Daniell arrived in Japan at the dawn of this turbulent decade. After the Crash is an anthology of essays that draw on firsthand observations of the built environment and architectural culture that emerged from the economically sober post-bubble period of the 1990s. Daniell uses projects and installations by architects such as Atelier Bow Wow, Toyo Ito, and the metabolists to illustrate the new relationships forged, most of necessity, between architecture and society in Japan.

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